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Henry Beston Society, Cape Cod Museum
of Natural History teaming up for 2008 exhibit


Bob Dwyer  (Executive Director/Cape Cod Museum of Natural History), Deb Richmond and Pam Fearn (Cape Cod Museum of Natural History), Robby McQueeney (Beston Society), and Don Wilding (Executive Director/Beston Society)

The Henry Beston Society is joining forces with the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History for an exhibit at the Brewster-based museum slated for a May 24, 2008 debut.

Titlted A Sense of Place, it will emphasize authors Henry Beston (The Outermost House), John Hay (The Run, The Great Beach) and Robert Finch (Common Ground, The Cape Itself), and the evolution of Cape Cod nature writing through the years. "These three are major writers with a passion -- keen observers …on Cape Cod," noted Robert Dwyer of the museum.

The museum, which credits Hay as one of its co-founders, ran an exhibit on Rachel Carson during 2007. Carson (Silent Spring, The Sea Around Us) was heavily influenced by Beston, and that prompted Dwyer to seek out more information on the Outermost House author for a 2008 exhibit. An online search brought him to the Henry Beston Society Web site, contact was made in mid-spring, and the two groups have been meeting regularly at the museum.

Both organizations have similar missions -- the importance of staying connected to nature, said Beston Society executive director Don Wilding. "For us to be approached by an organization the caliber of the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History is very exciting. We're really looking forward to working with them on this exhibit."

The exhibit will be aimed at both adults and children. In today's world, with all of its modern distractions, children have come to believe that nature is a destination, rather than a part of everyday life. The writings of Beston, Hay and Finch all emphasized the importance of staying connected to nature. "Nature is a part of our humanity, and without some awareness and experience of that divine mystery man ceases to be man," wrote Beston.

A performance of Ronald Perera's cantata, The Outermost House, by the Chatham Chorale, is also being planned for the exhibit's run.

All contents of this site Copyright 2008 by The Henry Beston Society, Inc., unless noted.

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